Mary Wells

Photo of Mary Wells

Dean of Engineering Professor Faculty of Engineering Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering Waterloo, Ontario mawells@uwaterloo.ca Office: (519) 888-4567 ext. 38356

Bio/Research

Mary Wells, PhD, is currently the Dean of Engineering for the University of Waterloo. Preceding this post, she was the Dean of the College of Engineering and Physical Science at the University of Guelph, a role she accepted in November 2017. This diverse College includes a School of engineering, ...

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Bio/Research

Mary Wells, PhD, is currently the Dean of Engineering for the University of Waterloo. Preceding this post, she was the Dean of the College of Engineering and Physical Science at the University of Guelph, a role she accepted in November 2017. This diverse College includes a School of engineering, a School of computer science, as well as the departments of physics, chemistry and mathematics/statistics. Professor Wells is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering at the University of Waterloo.

Professor Wells began her academic career at the University of British Columbia in 1996 in the Department of metals and materials engineering and in 2007, moved to the University of Waterloo's Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering as a Professor. She was chosen as the inaugural Associate Dean Outreach in 2008 and continued in this role until 2017. In 2013, Professor Wells was selected to be the Chair of the Ontario Network of Women in Engineering (ONWiE) for a five-year term. Professor Wells is widely respected for her work including attracting, engaging and retaining women in the engineering industry as well as her strategic leadership in building collaborative and fruitful relationships within a University setting that creates exciting and empowering opportunities for researchers, academics and staff.

Professor Wells’ research focuses on the development and manufacturing of advanced metallic products used in the transportation sector. This involves developing mathematical models of the manufacturing processes used to make metallic products, as well as understanding the microstructure and property changes that occur in the material. A materials final properties and structure depend on the process or manufacturing history such as thermal and deformation conditions. The mathematical models developed help manufacturers design casting and deformation processes that optimize a metal’s microstructure.

Professor Wells and her colleagues are working on the development of new processes to create laminate or clad metallic products via casting or deformation. The product resulting from these process are ones where the product’s surface will have different properties from its core, for example, a surface that is designed for corrosion and a core that is tailored for strength.


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